Marketing's lateral influence strategies and new product team comprehension in high-tech companies: A cross-national investigation

Kwaku Atuahene-Gima (First Author), Luigi M. De Luca (Participant Author)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal

    9 Citations (Web of Science)

    Abstract

    In high-tech companies marketing often has to strive for gaining influence in the new product development (NPD) process, and uses political strategies to supplement its low formal power. This Study examined the antecedents and outcomes of marketing's use of upward appeal and coalition building influence strategies in NPD, in Chinese and Australian high-tech companies. We proposed that marketing's use of both strategies is related to power sources (i.e., R&D department's power, marketing's information power and personal stake in the MID Outcomes) and NPD context characteristics (i.e., formalization of NPD activity, and R&D-marketing interaction). Results show that both power sources and NPD context are related to the use of lateral influence strategies by marketing participants in NPD, with notable differences in potency and direction between China and Australia. For example, higher R&D-marketing interaction increases the use of lateral influence strategies in Australia but decreases it in China. Oil the contrary, lateral influence strategies produce similar effects in the two cultural settings: while coalition building increases NPD team comprehension of marketing Issues in high-tech firms, upward appeal appears to hinder it, especially in the Chinese collectivistic context. We conclude with implications for future research and practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)664-676
    JournalIndustrial Marketing Management
    Volume37
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Corresponding author email

    kwaku@ceibs.edu, l.deluca2@aston.ac.uk

    Indexed by

    • ABDC-A*
    • Scopus
    • SSCI

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