Person-Organization Fit on Prosocial Identity: Implications on Employee Outcomes

Jongseok Cha (First Author), Tae-Yeol Kim (Participant Author), Young Kyun Chang (Participant Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal

31 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between person-organization (PO) fit on prosocial identity (prosocial PO fit) and various employee outcomes. The results of polynomial regression analysis based on a sample of 589 hospital employees, which included medical doctors, nurses, and staff, indicate joint effects of personal and organizational prosocial identity on the development of a sense of organizational identification and on the engagement in prosocial behaviors toward colleagues, organizations, and patients. Specifically, prosocial PO fit had a curvilinear relationship with organizational identification, such that organizational identification increased as organizational prosocial characteristics increased toward personal prosocial identity and then decreased when the organizational prosocial characteristics exceeded the personal prosocial identity. In addition, organizational identification and prosocial behaviors increased as both personal and organizational prosocial identity increased from low to high.[PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]; This study examined the relationship between person–organization (PO) fit on prosocial identity (prosocial PO fit) and various employee outcomes. The results of polynomial regression analysis based on a sample of 589 hospital employees, which included medical doctors, nurses, and staff, indicate joint effects of personal and organizational prosocial identity on the development of a sense of organizational identification and on the engagement in prosocial behaviors toward colleagues, organizations, and patients. Specifically, prosocial PO fit had a curvilinear relationship with organizational identification, such that organizational identification increased as organizational prosocial characteristics increased toward personal prosocial identity and then decreased when the organizational prosocial characteristics exceeded the personal prosocial identity. In addition, organizational identification and prosocial behaviors increased as both personal and organizational prosocial identity increased from low to high.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Corresponding author email

tykim@ceibs.edu

Keywords

  • Caring behavior
  • Organizational citizenship behavior
  • Organizational identification
  • Person–organization fit
  • Prosocial identity

Indexed by

  • FT
  • ABDC-A
  • Scopus
  • SSCI

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