Volunteer work in youth organizations: predicting distinct aspects of volunteering behavior from self- and other-oriented motives

Ilse Cornelis (First Author), David De Cremer (Participant Author), Alain Van Hiel (Participant Author)

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal

22 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

This study examined the impact of motivational underpinnings of volunteerism on self-reported volunteer behaviors and satisfaction. Data from 153 volunteers in youth organizations supported a two-dimensional structure of self- and other-oriented motives. Self-oriented motives were more important in explaining in-role volunteer behavior, while other-oriented concerns were also important in predicting extra-role volunteer behavior and satisfaction. These findings are discussed in the context of a functional approach to volunteerism and linked to recent findings regarding the role of self-and other-oriented motives from the organizational literature. Suggestions for recruiting and motivating young volunteers in youth development organizations are presented.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)456-466
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Corresponding author email

ilse.cornelis@khk.be

Keywords

  • CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR
  • COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
  • DETERMINANTS
  • FUNCTIONAL-APPROACH
  • JOB-PERFORMANCE
  • METAANALYSIS
  • MOTIVATIONS
  • PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR
  • ROLE-IDENTITY
  • SATISFACTION

Indexed by

  • ABDC-B
  • Scopus
  • SSCI

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